I surprised some people I know in the San Francisco Bay Area on Tuesday, when my voice and story came to them during their morning commutes on KQED radio, an NPR affiliate radio station in San Francisco. I was speaking about giving voice to our invisible disability, binocular vision therapy and learning as an adult, that I didn’t have magical vision. Doctors had left me uninformed about not seeing in depth.

Listen to or read the audio essay at this link:

https://ww2.kqed.org/perspectives/2016/12/19/seeing-2d-in-the-3d-world/

Advertisements

5 responses »

  1. Lynn Gehl says:

    thank you for this

    Chi-Miigwetch (Thank you),

    *Dr. Lynn Gehl, Ph.D.*

    Gii-Zhigaate-Mnidoo-Kwe, Mekina Ndoo-dem _______________________________________________ In creating a better world the turtle must to lead. Genuine solidarity, rather than false solidarity, is required. No one is free until the most oppressed are free. #followtheturtle

    Personal Website

    *This email may contain privileged and/or confidential information, and I do not waive any related rights. Any distribution, use, or copying of this email or the information it contains by anyone other than the intended recipient is unauthorized. If you received this email in error please delete it immediately from your system and notify the sender promptly by email that you have done so.*

    On Wed, Dec 21, 2016 at 3:18 AM, One Eyed Princess’ Blog wrote:

    > seeingindouble posted: “I surprised some people I know in the San > Francisco Bay Area on Tuesday, when my voice and story came to them during > their morning commutes on KQED radio, an NPR affiliate radio station in San > Francisco. I was speaking about giving voice to our invisible ” >

  2. Keith Cary says:

    I enjoyed hearing your KQED Perspective, just now, via streaming. I only wish I’d been tuned in and heard it randomly. (I listen to KQED a lot.) It would have been a pleasant surprise. — By the way, I’ve heard figures as high as 7% for strabismus (that was from Australia) but it was good that you chose a more conservation estimate.– Your switching your eyes was exactly what I experienced as a kid. I still do, actually, since I never got an operation. I thought it was a good way to see around a corner. Thanks for helping to bring strabismus to the public attention. — On a slightly different, though related, subject, a friend of mine just got back from San Jose where he got to try out 3D goggles. He was blown away. It’s a new company and I’ve forgotten the name. Not Occulus Rift. I can find out. In any case I think there’s great potential in that new technology for work in VT. I thought it might possibly interest you since you live in that area. — My friend is going to try to get his friend to bring the gear to Winters so I can try it. (I wonder if a startup might get good publicity or funding by letting their product be used as a therapy tool). I can use Google Cardboard, after a fashion, and have experienced brief, thrilling moments of 3D-like perception. It’s not something I think I should do often, as it seems to wake up some brain pathways that I’ve decided, regrettably, are best left asleep, due to my age, and to my pretty acute unoperated hypertropia. — I’m making slow progress through your thoughtful and insightful book, and enjoying it much. Thanks again for your work in this area.
    Keith Cary, Winters, CA

    • Keith Cary says:

      Oops, I didn’t mean hypertropia. (I should never use Latinate medical terms. I never get them right.) I’m cross-eyed, by about 40 degrees.

    • Hello Keith,

      Please do let me know the name of the 3D goggles so I can try them out.

      I’ve seen figures showing that amblyopia and strabismus may occur in 2-5% of the population. So I just took an average and made it 3%. But if it were 7%, that would make it even more imperative for eye doctors and pediatricians to learn about how this impacts people, especially since patients with nystagmus, some forms of cataracts, blindness in one eye and other conditions also have binocular vision problems.

      Thanks for your support! Susanna

  3. Robert Connoy says:

    Great, thank you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s